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Using the extended innovation attributes framework and consumer personal characteristics as predictors of internet banking adoption

Gounaris, Spiros and Koritos, Christos (2008) Using the extended innovation attributes framework and consumer personal characteristics as predictors of internet banking adoption. Journal of Financial Services Marketing, 13 (1). pp. 39-51. ISSN 1363-0539

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Abstract

The presumed dominant role of usability attributes (ie usefulness and ease of use) in predicting consumer adoption of a technologically based innovation (eg internet banking — IB) is reexamined, by using an extended framework, which, apart from usability, incorporates the social and psychological aspects of the adoption process. Furthermore, given that IB has been around for almost a decade, it is high time to update the profile of the potential adopters. Results, underscore the role of social factors as predictors of potential IB adopters, whereas the demographic profile of future IB adopters displays important differences compared to that of those already using IB. Possible explanations are discussed, along with implication for practitioners and suggestions for future research.