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Open Access research shaping international environmental governance...

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Tourism and generation Y

Baum, T. (2011) Tourism and generation Y. [Review]

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Abstract

The popular media, in developed countries, appears to have a particular and enduring fascination with inter-generational warfare, both on a micro-scale (within families) and at a societal level, where issues of, for example, youth taste and misdemeanour set alongside the intolerance of their elders feature widely within political and tabloid debate. At the same time, consumer marketing-led analysis has stimulated interest in generational theory and the characterisation of identified generations (based on cohorts of some 20 years) from 1900 onwards as G1, the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and, for children born in 2003 and onwards, Generation Z. Each generation is stereotyped with a range of attitudinal and behavioural characteristics, predominantly based on research and experience in the United States, which have been frequently attributed to similar populations in other developed countries.