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Molecular beam epitaxy of GaN1–xBix alloys with high bismuth content

Novikov, S.V. and Yu, K.M. and Levander, A.X. and Liliental-Weber, Z. and dos Reis, R. and Kent, A.J. and Tseng, A. and Dubon, O.D. and Wu, J. and Denlinger, J. and Walukiewicz, W. and Luckert, Franziska and Edwards, Paul and Martin, Robert and Foxon, C.T. (2012) Molecular beam epitaxy of GaN1–xBix alloys with high bismuth content. Physica Status Solidi A: Applications and Materials Science, 209 (3). pp. 419-423. ISSN 0031-8965

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Abstract

We have analysed bismuth incorporation into GaN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) at extremely low growth temperatures of less than ∼100 °C under both Ga-rich and N-rich growth conditions. The formation of amorphous GaN1−xBix alloys is promoted by growth under Ga-rich conditions. The amorphous matrix has a short-range order resembling random crystalline GaN1−xBix alloys. We have observed the formation of small crystalline clusters embedded into amorphous GaN1−xBix alloys. Despite the fact that the films are pseudo-amorphous we observe a well defined optical absorption edges that rapidly shift to very low energy of ∼1 eV.