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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

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EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Time varying optimal control of a non-linear system

Grimble, M.J. and Martin, P. (2003) Time varying optimal control of a non-linear system. In: 42nd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2003, 2003-12-09 - 2003-12-12.

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Abstract

The solution is given to a time-varying optimal state feedback problem with stochastic disturbances. The system is composed of a plant and disturbance model represented by polynomials in the delay operator, z(-1), leading to a solution involving spectral factorisation of operator equations and Diophantine operator equations. The cost function is over infinite time and the assumption is made that the system is time-varying for T steps into the future from the current sample and time-invariant thereafter. For a time-invariant system over infinite time, the optimal controller is a constant state-feedback matrix gain. Thus, with the assumption of time-invariance from T to, the feedback gain may be calculated using constant system polynomials. The solution of the spectral factors and Diophantine equations may then be computed recursively, for a scalar plant, working from T steps ahead to the current time. The controller calculated for the current time is then applied to the system. If the input non-linearity of a plant is represented in time-varying form, the time-varying ideas may be used to produce a nonlinear controller for the system. The example in this paper is for a smooth saturation non-linearity represented by a tanh function. Simulation results are given and it is clear that performance gains over a time-invariant controller are possible.