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Review of: Enterprising Women and Shipping in the nineteenth century, Helen Doe, Woodbridge, The Boydell Press, 2009

Baker, Nina (2010) Review of: Enterprising Women and Shipping in the nineteenth century, Helen Doe, Woodbridge, The Boydell Press, 2009. [Review]

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Abstract

This book is another keystone in the bridge constructed in recent years by researchers keen to lead us across the chasm to a fuller history of work than that left to us by the majority male body of work on the subject. It is now becoming obvious that women have worked in a far wider range and depth of occupations than previously thought. Doe’s detailed survey of five smaller seaports of the period has unearthed a mass of information about women’s involvement in owning, managing and even constructing ships in the heyday of that most masculine-seeming world of the wooden-walled sailing ship.