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Mental health promotion and the early years: the evidence base for interventions

Titterton, M. and Smart, H. and Hill, M. (2002) Mental health promotion and the early years: the evidence base for interventions. Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 1 (4). pp. 10-24.

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Abstract

This article presents selected findings from a review of programmes and interventions designed to promote mental health in the under-fives. Examples of interventions and characteristics of best practice and successful programmes are presented, with under-pinning evidence of effectiveness. The authors argue that further research into the effectiveness of programmes is needed and call for interventions designed to address and explore interactive processes and mechanisms of risk and resilience. There is also a need to increase awareness of the importance of children's mental health and build partnerships between the many professionals and agencies concerned. For programmes to work, a wider range of public policy measures need to be in place, including initiatives to reduce health inequalities.