Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

The looking after children in Scotland materials

Scott, J. and Hill, M. (2004) The looking after children in Scotland materials. Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care, 3 (1). pp. 17-30. ISSN 1478-1840

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The Looking After Children materials provide a comprehensive aid for planning and participation to help ensure the physical, emotional and social needs of young people in residential care. They comprise 2 sets of forms, recording essential information, plans and reviews, and assessment and action. They were adapted to Scottish context and legislation and piloted in 1997-8. Broad principles were welcomed, but usage only partial. By 2004 30 of 32 Scottish local authority social work departments had adopted all or part of the system. Reports on a survey in 2002-3 assessing how the materials were used in practice. Questionnaires were sent to local authorities; 19 (59%) were returned. Results described the organisational context; training and preparation; experience of use; information, care planning and review forms; assessment and action records; experience with other agencies; IT systems; implications for the residential care of young people; and the wider context and implications. Concludes that much creativity and imagination has been invested in implementation and training strategies for this first national system enabling the development of looked after children and young people to be recorded and followed, and a wealth of knowledge and practical advice shared. Difficulties remaining include time and resource constraints, and a need to engage staff more fully in communication.