Picture of model of urban architecture

Open Access research that is exploring the innovative potential of sustainable design solutions in architecture and urban planning...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Architecture based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

Explore all the Open Access research of the Department of Architecture. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Realistic evaluation of hull performance for rowing shells, canoes, and kayaks in unsteady flow

Day, Alexander and Campbell, Ian and Clelland, David and Doctors, Lawrence and Cichowicz, Jakub (2011) Realistic evaluation of hull performance for rowing shells, canoes, and kayaks in unsteady flow. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 (10). 1059–1069. ISSN 0264-0414

[img]
Preview
PDF (JSS 2011 paper as submitted NCS-new)
JSS_2011_paper_as_submitted_NCS_new.pdf
Preprint

Download (884kB) | Preview

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the effect of hull dynamics in shallow water on the hydrodynamic performance of rowing shells as well as canoes and kayaks. An approach was developed to generate data in a towing tank using a test rig capable of reproducing realistic speed profiles. The impact of unsteady shallow-water effects on wave-making resistance was examined via experimental measurements on a benchmark hull. The data generated were used to explore the validity of a computational approach developed to predict unsteady shallow-water wave resistance. Comparison of measured and predicted results showed that the computational approach correctly predicted complex unsteady wave-resistance phenomena at low oscillation frequency and speed, but that total resistance was substantially under-predicted at moderate oscillation frequency and speed. It was postulated that this discrepancy arose from unsteady viscous effects. This was investigated via hot-film measurements for a full-scale single scull in unsteady flow in both towing-tank and field-trial conditions. Results suggested a strong link between acceleration and turbulence and demonstrated that the measured real-world viscous-flow behaviour could be successfully reproduced in the tank. Thus a suitable tank-test approach could provide a reliable guide to hull performance characterization in unsteady flow.