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Driving innovations in manufacturing: Open Access research from DMEM

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Design, Manufacture & Engineering Management (DMEM).

Centred on the vision of 'Delivering Total Engineering', DMEM is a centre for excellence in the processes, systems and technologies needed to support and enable engineering from concept to remanufacture. From user-centred design to sustainable design, from manufacturing operations to remanufacturing, from advanced materials research to systems engineering.

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An insulin mediator preparation serves to stimulate the cyclic GMP activated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase rather than other purified insulin-activated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases

Pyne, N J and Houslay, M D (1988) An insulin mediator preparation serves to stimulate the cyclic GMP activated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase rather than other purified insulin-activated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 156 (1). pp. 290-296. ISSN 1090-2104

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Abstract

An insulin mediator preparation was obtained from rat hepatocytes which had been treated with insulin. This preparation inhibited adenylate cyclase activity. It stimulated the activity of homogeneous preparations of both the cytosolic and membrane-bound forms of rat liver cyclic GMP-activated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. It failed to activate homogeneous preparations of both the peripheral plasma membrane and 'dense-vesicle' cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases. The insulin mediator preparation stimulated cyclic GMP-activated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in a dose-dependent fashion with a hill coefficient of 0.46. Insulin caused the dose-dependent production of mediator activity in intact hepatocytes with a Ka of 9 pM, although concentrations of insulin greater than 10 nM progressively reduced stimulatory activity.