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Separation Free DNA Detection Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

van Lierop, Danny and Faulds, Karen and Graham, Duncan (2011) Separation Free DNA Detection Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. Analytical Chemistry, 83 (15). pp. 5817-5821. ISSN 0003-2700

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Abstract

Surface enhanced raman scattering (SEAS) based molecular diagnostic assays for the detection of specific DNA sequences have been developed in recent years to compete with the more common fluorescence based approaches. Current SERS assays either require time-consuming separation steps that increase assay cost and can also increase the risk of contamination or they are negative assays, where the signal intensity decreases in the presence of target DNA. Herein, we report a new separation free SEAS assay with an increase in signal intensity when target DNA is present using a specifically designed SERS primer. The presence of specific bacterial DNA from Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and SERS and indicates a new opportunity for exploration of SERS assays requiring minimal handling steps.