Picture map of Europe with pins indicating European capital cities

Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

Explore research outputs by the European Policies Research Centre...

A miniaturised integrated biophotonic point-of-care genotyping system

Girkin, John M and Mohammed, Mazher-iqbal and Ellis, Elizabeth M (2011) A miniaturised integrated biophotonic point-of-care genotyping system. Faraday Discussions, 149. pp. 115-123. ISSN 1359-6640

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

This paper reports the development of a novel genotyping device specifically designed for point-of-care applications. As the results of the human genome project are applied to clinical practice there is an increasing requirement for simple to operate high-speed, potentially low-cost genotyping devices for use in the clinic. The aim of such devices is not to specifically detect a full gene sequence but to monitor the presence of specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The instrument is designed to fulfil this specific clinical requirement. Using a FRET-based assay the instrument completes a full PCR process and then performs a melting point test to determine the exact SNPs present in the sample. Results are presented in which the instrument produces results within 18 min based upon saliva samples provided by the patient. The paper also reports successful results both with purified DNA samples and saliva-based samples which were taken from subjects after experiments deliberately aimed at confusing the instrument.