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Building quality assurance into metadata creation : an analysis based on the learning objects and e-prints communities of practice

Barton, Jane and Currier, Sarah and Hey, Jessie M.N. (2003) Building quality assurance into metadata creation : an analysis based on the learning objects and e-prints communities of practice. In: Dublin Core Conference 2003 (DC-2003): Support Communities of Discourse and Practice - Metadata Research and Applications, 2003-09-28 - 2003-10-02.

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Abstract

This paper challenges some of the assumptions underlying the metadata creation process in the context of two communities of practice, based around learning object repositories and open e-Print archives. The importance of quality assurance for metadata creation is discussed and evidence from the literature, from the practical experiences of repositories and archives, and from related research and practices within other communities is presented. Issues for debate and further investigation are identified, formulated as a series of key research questions. Although there is much work to be done in the area of quality assurance for metadata creation, this paper represents an important first step towards a fuller understanding of the subject.