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An analysis of dissipation functions in swarming systems

Bennet, Derek J. and Biggs, J.D. and McInnes, C.R. and Macdonald, M. (2010) An analysis of dissipation functions in swarming systems. In: 18th IFAC Symposium on Automatic Control in Aerospace, ACA 2010, 2010-09-06 - 2010-09-10.

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    Abstract

    Swarms of multiple, autonomous mobile agents have been shown to have advantages over single agent systems such as scalability, robustness and flexibility. This paper considers swarm pattern control using a generic artificial potential field and a range of dissipation control terms. An investigation of a number of dissipation terms to induce different swarm behaviours is undertaken. In addition, a novel dissipation control term is introduced based on time-delay feedback control. It is shown that a delayed dissipation term can induce vortex formations without knowledge of relative velocities. Finally, a stability analysis is undertaken that verifies swarm behaviour in a subset of these cases.