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Open Access research shaping international environmental governance...

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Comparison of 2 techniques used for the recovery of nematode infective larvae from pasture

Gettinby, G. and McKellar, Q.A. and Bairden, K. and Theodoridis, Y. and Whitelaw, A. (1985) Comparison of 2 techniques used for the recovery of nematode infective larvae from pasture. Research in Veterinary Science, 39 (1). pp. 99-102.

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Abstract

The recovery of gastrointestinal nematode infective larvae from herbage collected manually was compared with the recovery from herbage ingested by sheep with oesophageal fistulae, on five occasions during the grazing season. At least three times more larvae were recovered from the oesophageal fistulates than by manual collection. There was no significant variation between the numbers of larvae collected at 09.00, 12.00 and 15.00, nor was there any difference in the distribution of genera recovered by the two methods. The worm burdens of tracer lambs and the larval counts from the fistulated sheep were used to estimate the rate of larval establishment.