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Influence of interleukin-1 beta and hyaluronan on proteoglycan release from equine navicular hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage

Frean, S.P. and Gettinby, G. and May, S.A. and Lees, P. (2000) Influence of interleukin-1 beta and hyaluronan on proteoglycan release from equine navicular hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 23 (2). pp. 67-72. ISSN 0140-7783

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Abstract

Proteoglycan (PG) release, in response to recombinant human interleukin-1β (rh-IL-1β), was measured in cartilage explants obtained from the equine distal sesamoid bone (navicular bone). Fibrocartilage from the surface of the navicular bone apposing the deep digital flexor tendon and hyaline cartilage from the surface of the navicular bone articulating with the middle phalanx were labelled with 35SO4. Hyaline cartilage from the distal metacarpus was used as a control tissue. Following radiolabel incorporation, the three cartilage types were treated with rh-IL-1β (100 U/mL) in the presence of hyaluronan (0.2, 2, 20, 200 and 2000 μg/mL). rh-IL-1β-Induced PG release was measured by scintillation assay of PG-bound radiolabel. Increases in PG release of 94% (P < 0.01), 101% (P < 0.05) and 122% (P < 0.05), in response to rh-IL-1β, were noted in fibrocartilage, navicular hyaline cartilage and metacarpal hyaline cartilage, respectively. Hyaluronan (0.2 μg/mL) significantly reduced rh-IL-1β-induced PG release in metacarpal hyaline cartilage (P < 0.01). In fibrocartilage and navicular hyaline cartilage, hyaluronan did not reduce PG release and at some concentrations appeared to increase PG release, although this was not statistically significant. These experiments show that (i) fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage of the navicular bone release PGs in response to rh-IL-1β, and (ii) hyaluronan does not prevent rh-IL-1β-induced breakdown of navicular bone cartilage.