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'An umbrella full of holes?' Corporate Restructuring, Redundancy and the Effectiveness of ICE Regulations

Taylor, Phil and Baldry, Chris and Danford, Andy and Stewart, Paul (2009) 'An umbrella full of holes?' Corporate Restructuring, Redundancy and the Effectiveness of ICE Regulations. Industrial Relations/Relations Industrielles, 64 (1). pp. 27-49. ISSN 0034-379X

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Abstract

This article concerns the manner in which the European Union Information and Consultation of Employees (ICE) Directive has been implemented in the UK in the harsh corporate conditions of restructuring, redundancy and site closure. Drawing on interview and documentary evidence from six case companies (Peugeot-Citroen, General Motors, Prudential, Aviva, Marconi, Rolls Royce), the article exposes major faultlines in the effectiveness of the UK's ICE Regulations to provide even limited protection for employees who were presented with redundancy as a fait accompli. Contrary to management claims ICE arrangements have not provided additional levels of representation either to complement unions or to fill the 'representation gap' left by declining coverage. The failure to consult raises broader questions of the wider political and legislative environment in the UK.