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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Tribal mattering spaces : social-networking sites, celebrity affiliations, and tribal innovations

Hamilton, K.L. and Hewer, P.A. (2010) Tribal mattering spaces : social-networking sites, celebrity affiliations, and tribal innovations. Journal of Marketing Management, 26 (3-4). pp. 271-289. ISSN 0267-257X

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Abstract

In this paper, we explore the opportunities and possibilities of Web 2.0 through the theoretical lens of tribes and fandom, arguing that social-networking sites centring on iconic celebrities provide a rich context to explore notions of tribal identities and their forms of interaction, connectivity, and creativity. Employing what we term a Netnographic Imagination, we seek to explore the nature and character of this tribal context to provide insights into the tribal mattering spaces that are constructed around celebrity brands. Our analysis highlights the passions and enthusiasms within such emotional communities and the investments they make in celebrity brands, along with the forms of critique they construct around their associated marketing practices. Finally, we draw attention to the tribal innovations that emerge from the sense of togetherness and belonging made explicit through such tribal affiliations.