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Design and assembly of a magneto-inertial wearable device for ecological behavioural analysis of infants

Taffoni, Fabrizio and Campolo, Domenico and Delafield-Butt, Jonathan and Keller, Flavio and Guglielmelli, Eugenio (2008) Design and assembly of a magneto-inertial wearable device for ecological behavioural analysis of infants. In: Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2008. IEEE, pp. 3832-3837. ISBN 978-1-4244-2057-5

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Abstract

There are recent evidence which show how brain development is strictly linked to the action. Movements shape and are, in turn, shaped by cortical and sub-cortical areas. In particular spontaneous movements of newborn infants matter for developing the capability of generating voluntary skill movements. Therefore studying spontaneous infants’ movements can be useful to understand the main developmental milestones achieved by humans from birth onward. This work focuses on the design and development of a mechatronic wearable device for ecological movement analysis called WAMS (Wrist and Ankle Movement Sensor). The design and assembling of the device is presented, as well as the communication protocol and the synchronization with other marker-based optical movement analysis systems.