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A window opening algorithm and UK office temperature field results and thermal simulation

Rijal, Hom B. and Tuohy, Paul Gerard and Nicol, J. Fergus and Humphreys, Michael A. and Clarke, Joseph Andrew (2007) A window opening algorithm and UK office temperature field results and thermal simulation. In: 10th IBPSA Conference on Building Simulation 2007, 2007-09-03 - 2007-09-06.

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Abstract

This investigation of the window opening data from extensive field surveys in UK office buildings investigates 1) how people control the indoor environment by opening windows, 2) the cooling potential of opening windows, and 3) the use of an “adaptive algorithm” for predicting window opening behaviour for thermal simulation in ESP-r. We found that the mean indoor and outdoor temperatures when the window was open were higher than when it was closed, but show that nonetheless there was a useful cooling effect from opening a window. The adaptive algorithm for window opening behaviour was then used in thermal simulation studies for some typical office designs. The thermal simulation results were in general agreement with the findings of the field surveys.