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Emission dynamics of red emitting InGaN/GaN single quantum wells

Chen, F. and Cartwright, A.N. and Liu, C. and Watson, I.M. (2005) Emission dynamics of red emitting InGaN/GaN single quantum wells. Physica Status Solidi C, 2 (7). pp. 2787-2790. ISSN 1610-1642

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Abstract

Emission dynamics of two InGaN/GaN single quantum well red emitters were investigated through time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A clear phase separation, where a higher energy (blue) emission and a lower energy (red) emission appear simultaneously, was observed. The maximum position of blue emission is consistent with the bandgap value of the InGaN quantum well. As the time after pulsed excitation increases, the higher energy emission decreased more rapidly than that of the lower energy emission. In addition, the temperature dependence of the peak position of lower energy emission showed an initial redshift followed by a blueshift, reflecting the thermal distribution and transfer of localized carriers within different potential minima.