A novel activated carbon material from peanut shells for the removal of methyl orange and methylene blue dyes from wastewater : kinetics, isotherms, and mechanism

Aladeokin, Oluwagbemi and Fletcher, Ashleigh (2024) A novel activated carbon material from peanut shells for the removal of methyl orange and methylene blue dyes from wastewater : kinetics, isotherms, and mechanism. Adsorption Science & Technology. ISSN 2048-4038 (https://doi.org/10.1177/02636174241256843)

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Abstract

This study investigated the removal of methyl orange and methylene blue dyes from an aqueous phase using a novel activated carbon material derived from peanut shells. The effects of pH, contact-time, and initial dye concentration on the adsorption performance were evaluated. The adsorption kinetics were fitted with pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models, while the adsorption isotherms were modelled using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips equations. The results showed that the adsorption of both dyes followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the Freundlich and Sips isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacities of the carbon material for MO and MB, according to the Sips model, were 4584 mg/g and 1769 mg/g, respectively. The pH range of 3–11 had negligible influence on the adsorption capacities of both dyes. The adsorption mechanism was mainly attributed to π–π interactions, n–π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interactions, and pore filling. The activated carbon material exhibited good reusability and stability, achieving over 90% dye removal, after five cycles of adsorption-desorption using hot (90 ± 2 °C) deionized water as the eluent, indicating that the carbon material synthesized from peanut shells is a promising adsorbent for the removal of ionic dyes from wastewater.