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How much range of motion of the knee do patients have after knee arthroplasty, is it related to preoperative range and do they use it during functional activity ?

Rowe, P.J. and Myles, C.M. and Nutton, R.W. (2005) How much range of motion of the knee do patients have after knee arthroplasty, is it related to preoperative range and do they use it during functional activity ? In: Knee Arthroplasty: Engineering Functionality, 2005-04-07 - 2005-04-09.

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Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between active range of motion of the knee, the functional activity of the knee measured using electrogoniometry during eleven functional activities of daily living and the patients' quality of life prior to a two years following total knee arthroplasty. The study found that OA leads to a loss of, and knee arthroplasty fails to fully restore, active joint range, knee excursion during functional activity and physical quality of life when compared to normal subjects. The majority of patients lose active range and functional range during activities of daily living during the first two years postoperatively.