Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

The concept of mass-density in classical thermodynamics and the Boltzmann kinetic equation for dilute gases

Dadzie, S. Kokou and Reese, Jason M. (2008) The concept of mass-density in classical thermodynamics and the Boltzmann kinetic equation for dilute gases. In: Proceedings of the 26th International Symposium on Rarified Gas Dynamics. American Institute of Physics. ISBN 9780735406155

[img]
Preview
Text (strathprints008149)
strathprints008149.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (83kB) | Preview

Abstract

In this paper we discuss the mass-density of gas media as represented in kinetic theory. It is argued that conventional representations of this variable in gas kinetic theory contradict a macroscopic field variable and thermodynamic property in classical thermodynamics. We show that in cases where mass-density variations exist throughout the medium, introducing the mass-density as a macroscopic field variable leads to a restructuring of the diffusive/convective fluxes and implies some modifications to the hydrodynamic equations describing gas flows and heat transfer. As an illustration, we consider the prediction of mass-density profiles in a simple heat conduction problem between parallel plates maintained at different temperatures.