Violet-blue 405-nm light-based photoinactivation for pathogen reduction of human plasma provides broad antibacterial efficacy without visible degradation of plasma proteins

Stewart, Caitlin F. and Tomb, Rachael M. and Ralston, Heather J and Armstrong, Jack and Anderson, John G and MacGregor, Scott J and Atreya, Chintamani D and Maclean, Michelle (2022) Violet-blue 405-nm light-based photoinactivation for pathogen reduction of human plasma provides broad antibacterial efficacy without visible degradation of plasma proteins. Photochemistry and Photobiology. ISSN 0031-8655

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    Abstract

    In transfusion medicine, bacterial contamination can occur in ex vivo stored blood plasma, and there are continued efforts to improve blood safety and reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections. Visible 405-nm violet-blue light has demonstrated potential for in situ pathogen reduction in ex vivo stored plasma and platelet concentrates. This study investigates the broad-spectrum antibacterial efficacy and compatibility potential of 405-nm light for treatment of blood plasma. Human plasma seeded with bacteria at a range of densities (10 1–10 3, 10 4–10 6, 10 7–10 8 CFU mL −1) was exposed to 360 J cm −2 405-nm light (1 h at 0.1 W cm −2), with this fixed dose selected based on the initial analysis of inactivation kinetics. One-dimensional protein mobility analysis and measurement of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) was conducted to evaluate compatibility of the antimicrobial dose with plasma proteins and, identify upper levels at which protein degradation can be detected. Broad-spectrum antibacterial efficacy was observed with a fixed treatment of 360 J cm −2, with 98.9–100% inactivation achieved across all seeding densities for all organisms, except E. coli, which achieved 95.1–100% inactivation. At this dose (360 J cm −2), no signs of protein degradation occurred. Overall, 405-nm light shows promise for broad-spectrum bacterial inactivation in blood plasma, while preserving plasma protein integrity.

    ORCID iDs

    Stewart, Caitlin F., Tomb, Rachael M. ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3261-7673, Ralston, Heather J, Armstrong, Jack, Anderson, John G ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4151-1619, MacGregor, Scott J ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0808-585X, Atreya, Chintamani D and Maclean, Michelle ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5750-0397;