[Book review] : Walter Citrine. Forgotten Statesman of the Trades Union Congress by Jim Moher [JGM Books, 2021, pp xxii + 377, ISBN 978 09557 107 28]

Zahn, Rebecca (2022) [Book review] : Walter Citrine. Forgotten Statesman of the Trades Union Congress by Jim Moher [JGM Books, 2021, pp xxii + 377, ISBN 978 09557 107 28]. [Review] (https://doi.org/10.1093/indlaw/dwab038)

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Abstract

Any sophisticated study of labour law mandates an understanding not only of the discipline's legislative content but also the historical, social, political, and economic context within which it has evolved, and within which its legislation plays out. Thus, labour law scholars have been receptive to socio legal methods—going beyond doctrinal legal sources and looking to other disciplines. Labour law scholarship stands out for retaining an open, multi disciplinary approach. Early labour law scholars in particular relied on history to develop new understandings for their discipline and to discover the role played by nonstate actors such as trade unions and employer associations in law creation and law enforcement. More recently, researchers have turned to philosophy and political theory, economics, sociology, and political economy approaches in order to explain and advance the discipline at a time when the labour market has fundamentally changed. Although few contemporary academic labour lawyers would identify as labour law historians, history continues to provide an entrée into developing different ways of understanding the origins and future trajectory of labour law and labour relations systems.

ORCID iDs

Zahn, Rebecca ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9378-5772;