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Getting the inactive active : implications for public health policy

Mutrie, Nanette and Blamey, Avril (2004) Getting the inactive active : implications for public health policy. Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, 124 (1). p. 16. ISSN 1466-4240

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Abstract

Epidemiological data have established that a sedentary lifestyle increases the incidence of at least 17 medical conditions. The evidence is strongest for coronary heart disease. A sedentary lifestyle is now the normal lifestyle for the majority of the populations in developed countries and relapse from regular physical activity is also high. Thus there is clear need for public policy aimed at increasing the physical activity levels in the population. Policy makers have begun to respond to this need and recently Scottish and English plans for increasing physical activity levels in the populations have been published.