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Effect of an exercise consultation on maintenance of physical activity following completion of phase iii cardiac rehabilitation

Hughes, Adrienne R. and Mutrie, Nanette and MacIntyre, Paul D. (2007) Effect of an exercise consultation on maintenance of physical activity following completion of phase iii cardiac rehabilitation. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, 14 (1). ISSN 1741-8267

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Abstract

Many patients do not maintain physical activity levels after completion of phase III exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. This study determined the effect of an exercise consultation on maintenance of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness 12 months after completion of a phase III exercise programme. Seventy cardiac patients were randomized to the experimental (exercise consultation and exercise information) or control groups (exercise information only). Both groups were regularly active at baseline. The between-group difference for the change in total activity (min/week) assessed by the 7-day recall was significant from baseline to 12 months [98% confidence interval (CI) -295, -20]. Total activity was maintained in the experimental group (98% CI -63, 154) and significantly decreased in the control group (115 min/week; 98% CI -228, -28) from baseline to 12 months. The between-group difference for the change in accelerometer counts/week was not significant from baseline to 6 (98% CI -1 143 720, 607 430) or 12 months (98% CI -1 131 128, 366 473). A comparable, significant decrease in peak oxygen uptake occurred from baseline to 12 months in experimental (1.8 ml/kg per min; 98% CI -3.2, -0.3) and control participants (2.3 ml/kg per min; -3.8, -0.8). Lipids, quality of life, anxiety and depression were normal at baseline and did not significantly change in either group over time. Exercise consultation was effective in maintaining self-reported physical activity, but not peak oxygen uptake, for 12 months after completion of phase III.