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Wall following to escape local minima for swarms of agents using internal states and emergent behaviour

Mabrouk, M. H. and McInnes, C. R. (2008) Wall following to escape local minima for swarms of agents using internal states and emergent behaviour. In: Proceedings of the World Congress on Engineering 2008. International Association of Engineers (IAENG), pp. 24-31. ISBN 9789889867195

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Abstract

Natural examples of emergent behaviour, in groups due to interactions among the group's individuals, are numerous. Our aim, in this paper, is to use complex emergent behaviour among agents that interact via pair-wise attractive and repulsive potentials, to solve the local minima problem in the artificial potential based navigation method. We present a modified potential field based path planning algorithm, which uses agent internal states and swarm emergent behaviour to enhance group performance. The algorithm is used successfully to solve a reactive path-planning problem that cannot be solved using conventional static potential fields due to local minima formation. Simulation results demonstrate the ability of a swarm of agents to perform problem solving using the dynamic internal states of the agents along with emergent behaviour of the entire group.