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Movement studies to evaluate health technologies as part of a holistic assessment based on the WHO ICF

Rowe, P.J. (2003) Movement studies to evaluate health technologies as part of a holistic assessment based on the WHO ICF. Physiotherapie, 1 (3). pp. 2-9. ISSN 0031-9392

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Abstract

Assistive technology (AT) supports function and independence in life roles for persons with disabilities. AT assessment, intervention planning, and outcomes measurement are complicated by the heterogeneity of user populations, AT devices, contextual environments, and participation needs of device users. This paper will discuss the potential for the International Classification for Health, Disability and Functioning (ICF) (World Health Organization, 2001) to be used as a clinical assessment tool that supports AT device recommendation. The paper will highlight the relevance of the ICF to AT practice, illustrate compatibility of the ICF model to AT assessment elements, and discuss the need for development of an ICF based AT assessment.