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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Regression analysis of gait parameters with speed in normal children walking at self-selected speeds

Stansfield, B.W. and Hillman, S.J. and Hazelwood, M.E. and Robb, J.E. (2006) Regression analysis of gait parameters with speed in normal children walking at self-selected speeds. Gait and Posture, 23 (3). pp. 288-294. ISSN 0966-6362

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Abstract

Dimensionless analysis ensures that differences in sizes (e.g. height and weight) of children have a minimal influence on gait parameters. The results of changes in speed on gait parameters were examined using dimensionless analysis on data from a prospective 5-year study of 16 children. Linear regression analysis of peak and trough values of temporal distance parameters, ground reaction forces, joint angles, moments and powers provide a quantitative description of gait development with normalised speed. These linear relationships can be used to estimate gait parameters from speed measurements for normal subjects. However, caution is advised in using the data to attempt to predict an individual's gait parameters due to the wide spread of data about the regression lines and we do not recommend that the data be used to extrapolate the regression data to wider speed ranges.