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High-sensitivity free space optical communications using low size, weight and power hardware

Griffiths, Alexander D. and Herrnsdorf, Johannes and Almer, Oscar and Henderson, Robert K. and Strain, Michael J. and Dawson, Martin D. (2019) High-sensitivity free space optical communications using low size, weight and power hardware. Working paper. arXiv.org, Ithica, N.Y..

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Abstract

Free space optical communication systems with extremely high detector sensitivities are attractive for various applications with low size, weight and power requirements. For these practical systems, integrated hardware elements with small form factor are needed. Here, we demonstrate a communication link using a CMOS integrated micro-LED and array of single-photon avalanche diodes. These integrated systems provide a data rate of 100 Mb/s at a sensitivity of -55.2 dBm, corresponding to 7.5 detected photons per bit.