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Clinical Risk Management Training with NHS Digital : a Review

Barry, Michael (2018) Clinical Risk Management Training with NHS Digital : a Review. Digital Health & Care Institute, Glasgow.

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Abstract

After completing the Maker’s Academy software development course in 2016, I entered 2017 as a fresh faced self-titled "Clinician Software Developer", thinking I would change the system by building the technology I felt was missing. I started with some low hanging fruit to test out my skills - digitising the “heart attack” treatment pathway in the Emergency Department. I had visions of people using my app to decide how to manage patients, replacing the tatty sheet of paper currently pasted to the Emergency Department wall. The app looked great, and the specialists I built it with loved it. But the first time I tried to use it on a hospital computer, it took me to the wrong decision each time I used it. It turned out that the Microsoft Internet browser worked slightly differently to the Google Chrome browser that I had built it with.