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Externally-triggered activation and inhibition of optical pulsating regimes in quantum-dot mode-locked lasers

Robertson, Joshua and Ackemann, Thorsten and Lester, Luke F. and Hurtado, Antonio (2018) Externally-triggered activation and inhibition of optical pulsating regimes in quantum-dot mode-locked lasers. Scientific Reports, 8. ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

Controlled generation and inhibition of externally-triggered picosecond optical pulsating regimes are demonstrated experimentally in a quantum dot mode locked laser (QDMLL) subject to external injection of an amplitude modulated optical signal. This approach also allows full control and repeatability of the time windows of generated picosecond optical pulses; hence permitting to define precisely their temporal duration (from <1ns spans) and repetition frequency (from sub-Hz to at least hundreds of MHz). The use of a mono lithic QDMLL, operating at 1300 nm, provides a system with a very small footprint that is fully compatible with optical telecommunication networks. This offers excellent prospects for use in applications requiring the delivery of ultrashort optical pulses at precise time instants and at tunable rates, such as optical imaging, time-of-flight diagnostics and optical communication systems.