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The UK space and planetary robotics network

Ellery, Alex and Barnes, Dave and Buckland, Rodney and Welch, Chris and Garry, James and Zarnecki, John and Gebbie, Jonathan and Green, Ashley and Smith, Mark and Hall, David and McInnes, Colin and Winfield, Alan and Nehmzow, Ulrich and Ball, Andrew (2003) The UK space and planetary robotics network. JBIS, Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, 56 (9-10). pp. 328-337. ISSN 0007-084X

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Abstract

A number of academic engineering research groups around the UK have become increasingly interested in the applications of robotics or robotics techniques to solving problems in space engineering. Although these groups have sprung up independently and have worked in essentially independent areas, they are seeking to form themselves into a network offering a diverse range of expertise within the UK with the capability of developing complete space robotic systems. Space robotics is an area in which the UK has dabbled in the past, but for the first time, the UK offers a solid base of expertise in mobile robotics and associated space engineering which would enable the UK to contribute to European space robotics projects funded by ESA and/or national agencies. To that end, following the inaugural meeting of the Space & Planetary Robotics Network, an extended group of interested parties will be putting forward an-application to EPSRC for Network funding.