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Comparison of the finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the double vortex pairing problem using the SU2 software suite

Singh, Kevin K. and Drikakis, Dimitris and Frank, Michael and Kokkinakis, Ioannis W. and Alonso, Juan J. and Economon, Tom D. and van der Weide, Edwin T. A. (2018) Comparison of the finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the double vortex pairing problem using the SU2 software suite. In: 2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. AIAA, Reston, VA.. ISBN 9781624105241

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Abstract

A numerical investigation of finite volume (FV) and discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods in the framework of the SU2 software is presented. The accuracy of different numerical variants is assessed with reference to the low Mach double vortex pairing flow problem, which has recently been proposed as a benchmark for studying the properties of structured and unstructured grid based methods with respect to turbulent-like vortices. The present study reveals that low-Mach corrections significantly improve the accuracy of second- and third-order, unstructured grid based schemes, at flow speeds in the incompressible limit. Furthermore, the 3rd-order DG method produces results similar to 11th-order accurate FV volume schemes.