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A comparison of gait one year post operation in an RCT of robotic UKA versus traditional Oxford UKA

Motesharei, Arman and Rowe, Philip and Blyth, Mark and Jones, Bryn and Maclean, Angus (2018) A comparison of gait one year post operation in an RCT of robotic UKA versus traditional Oxford UKA. Gait and Posture, 62. pp. 41-45. ISSN 0966-6362

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Abstract

Robot-assisted unicompartmental knee surgery has been shown to improve the accuracy of implant alignment. However, little research has been conducted to ascertain if this results in a measureable improvement in knee function post operatively and a more normal gait. The kinematics of 70 OA knees were assessed using motion analysis in an RCT (31 receiving robotic-assisted surgery, and 39 receiving traditional manual surgery) and compared to healthy knees. Statistically significant kinematic differences were seen between the two surgical groups from foot-strike to mid-stance. The robotic-assisted group achieved a higher knee excursion (18.0°, SD 4.9°) compared to the manual group (15.7°, SD 4.1°). There were no significant difference between the healthy group and the robotic assisted group, however there was a significant difference between the healthy group and the manual group (p < 0.001). Hence robotically-assisted knee replacement with Mako Restoris Implants appears to lead not only to better implant alignment but also some kinematic benefits to the user during gait.