Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

A qualitative exploration of parent perceptions and involvement within school-based physical activity and health and well being activities

Donnelly, Samantha and Arthur, Rosie and Gibson, Ann-Marie and Buchan, Duncan (2017) A qualitative exploration of parent perceptions and involvement within school-based physical activity and health and well being activities. In: Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 2017-12-11 - 2017-12-12, UK.

[img]
Preview
Text (Donnelly-etal-BPS-2017-A-qualitative-exploration-of-parent-perceptions-and-involvement-within-school)
Donnelly_etal_BPS_2017_A_qualitative_exploration_of_parent_perceptions_and_involvement_within_school.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (164kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    Physical activity and health interventions involving both schools and parents have potential to be effective. However, little is known about the most effective methods to encourage parent involvement in such interventions. Therefore, this study was undertaken to obtain parent perceptions of current school-based physical activity and health practices, informing the design of future school-based interventions in Scotland involving parents. The findings from this study indicate that altering school practices and improving parent-school communication could be effective ways to increase parent involvement in school-based health and physical activity interventions.