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GTOC9 : Methods and results from University of Strathclyde (team Strath++)

Ortega Absil, Carlos and Ricciardi, Lorenzo A. and Di Carlo, Marilena and Greco, Cristian and Serra, Romain and Polnik, Mateusz and Vroom, Aram and Riccardi, Annalisa and Minisci, Edmondo and Vasile, Massimiliano (2018) GTOC9 : Methods and results from University of Strathclyde (team Strath++). Acta Futura (11). pp. 57-70.

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Abstract

The design and planning of space trajectories is a challenging problem in mission analysis. In the last years global optimisation techniques have proven to be a valuable tool for automating the design process that otherwise would mostly rely on engineers’ expertise. The paper presents the optimisation approach and problem formulation proposed by the team Strathclyde++ to address the problem of the 9th edition of the Global Trajectory Optimisation Competition. While the solution approach is introduced for the design of a set of multiple debris removal missions, the solution idea can be generalised to a wider set of trajectory design problems that have a similar structure.