Picture offshore wind farm

Open Access: World leading research into plasma physics...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Physics, including those researching plasma physics.

Plasma physics explores the '4th' state of matter known as 'plasma'. Profound new insights are being made by Strathclyde researchers in their attempts to better understand plasma, its behaviour and applications. Areas of focus include plasma wave propagation, non-linear wave interactions in the ionosphere, magnetospheric cyclotron instabilities, the parametric instabilities in plasmas, and much more.

Based on the REF 2014 GPA Scores, Times Higher Education ranked Strathclyde as number one in the UK for physics research.

Explore Open Access plasma physics research and of the Department of Physics more generally. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Coherent microwave generation from a pseudospark cathode Cherenkov maser

Yin, H. and He, W. and Robb, G. R. M. and Phelps, A. D. R. and Ronald, K. and Cross, A. W. (1999) Coherent microwave generation from a pseudospark cathode Cherenkov maser. Physical Review Special Topics: Accelerators and Beams, 2 (2). ISSN 2469-9888

[img]
Preview
Text (Yin-etal-PRST-AB-1999-Coherent-microwave-generation-from-a-pseudospark-cathode-Cherenkov-maser)
Yin_etal_PRST_AB_1999_Coherent_microwave_generation_from_a_pseudospark_cathode_Cherenkov_maser.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 logo

Download (145kB) | Preview

Abstract

Experimental results are presented from the first free electron maser experiment to use a pseudospark electron source. A pulsed, 70–80 kV, 10 A electron beam of normalized brightness 10^11A(m*rad)^(−2) and current density 1kAcm^(−2) from a pseudospark electron cathode was used to produce coherent microwave radiation via a Cherenkov interaction between the electron beam and the TM01 mode of a 60-cm-long alumina-lined waveguide. A gain of 29 dB was measured with an output power of 2 kW in the frequency range 25.5–28.6 GHz. The experimental results were found to be consistent with numerical simulations of Cherenkov amplification.