Picture of model of urban architecture

Open Access research that is exploring the innovative potential of sustainable design solutions in architecture and urban planning...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Architecture based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

Explore all the Open Access research of the Department of Architecture. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Displacing air conditioning in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia : an evaluation of 'fabric first' design integrated with hybrid night radiant and ground pipe cooling systems

Hijazi, Jamil and Howieson, Stirling (2018) Displacing air conditioning in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia : an evaluation of 'fabric first' design integrated with hybrid night radiant and ground pipe cooling systems. Building Services Engineering Research and Technology. ISSN 0143-6244

[img]
Preview
Text (Howieson-Hijazi-BSERT-2018-Displacing-air-conditioning-in-KSA-an-evaluation-of-fabric-first-design)
Howieson_Hijazi_BSERT_2018_Displacing_air_conditioning_in_KSA_an_evaluation_of_fabric_first_design.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

This paper presents an investigation into the viability of ‘fabric first’ intelligent architectural design measures, in combination with a hybrid cooling system (HCS). The specific aim is to displace AC and reduce CO2, while maintaining thermal comfort, in a typical housing block in KSA. The results of thermal modelling and prototype field trials suggest that passive design measures (PDMs) combined with night radiant cooling and supply ventilation via ground pipes, can negate the requirement for a standard AC system. Such a strategy may also have a remarkably short payback period when energy savings, in use, are set against the additional capital costs associated with improved building fabric performance.