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Deactivation of the ruthenium excited state by enhanced homogeneous charge transport : implications for electrochemiluminescent thin film sensors

O'Reilly, Emmet J. and Keyes, Tia E. and Forster, Robert J. and Dennany, Lynn (2018) Deactivation of the ruthenium excited state by enhanced homogeneous charge transport : implications for electrochemiluminescent thin film sensors. Electrochemistry Communications, 86. pp. 90-93. ISSN 1388-2481

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Abstract

The electrochemiluminescent (ECL) performance of three ruthenium-based metallopolymer platforms with different homogeneous charge transfer diffusion coefficients (DCT) is reported. Significantly, simultaneous detection of light and current in tandem with steady-state photoluminescence studies demonstrate that increasing the rate of Ru3+ production via enhanced charge transport results in a decrease in ECL intensity of up to 82% when the concentration of the co-reactant, sodium oxalate, is low, i.e., sub-mM. Spectroelectrochemical studies demonstrate that for maximum sensitivity to be obtained, the electroactive properties of the polymeric support matrix need to be considered in tandem with luminophore, analyte and co-reactant concentrations.