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A model-based extension to HiP-HOPS for dynamic fault propagation studies

Kabir, Sohag and Papadopoulos, Yiannis and Walker, Martin and Parker, David and Aizpurua, Jose Ignacio and Lampe, Jorg and Rude, Erich (2017) A model-based extension to HiP-HOPS for dynamic fault propagation studies. In: Model-Based Safety and Assessment - 5th International Symposium, IMBSA 2017. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, LNCS 1043 . Springer. ISBN 978-3-319-64118-8

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Abstract

HiP-HOPS is a model-based approach for assessing the dependability of safety-critical systems. The method combines models, logic, probabilities and nature-inspired algorithms to provide advanced capabilities for design optimisation, requirement allocation and safety argument generation. To deal with dynamic systems, HiP-HOPS has introduced temporal operators and a temporal logic to represent and assess event sequences in component failure modelling. Although this approach has been shown to work, it is not entirely consistent with the way designers tend to express operational dynamics in models which show mode and state sequences. To align HiP-HOPS better with typical design techniques, in this paper, we extend the method with the ability to explicitly consider different modes of operation. With this added capability HiP-HOPS can create and analyse temporal fault trees from architectural models of a system which are augmented with mode information