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Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

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Sustainable development of the built environment : response to contradiction through the circular economy and designing out waste in the construction industry

Grierson, David (2017) Sustainable development of the built environment : response to contradiction through the circular economy and designing out waste in the construction industry. In: Designing Out Construction Waste, 2017-03-03 - 2017-03-03, Technology and Innovation Centre, University of Strathclyde Glasgow.

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Abstract

The concept of the 'circular economy,' a term perhaps unfamiliar just a few years ago, has now caught the imagination of thought-leaders across the world, and is taking shape as a viable, practical alternative to the current linear economic model based on the notion of 'take-make-dispose' – a model that has, for generations, embodied an expanding culture of waste production. With 3 billion middle class consumers expected to enter the global market place by 2030 the need for changing our relationship with waste is urgent.