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Multilayered piezoelectric composite transducers

O'Leary, R.L. and Parr, A.C.S. and Hayward, G. (2004) Multilayered piezoelectric composite transducers. In: 2003 IEEE Symposium on Ultrasonics. IEEE, Piscataway, pp. 1306-1309.

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Abstract

Multilayered piezoelectric materials present themselves as a suitable technology for the development of sub 100kHz transducers. A variety of different configurations have been proposed, including stacked 2-2, 1-3 and 3-1 connectivity configurations. Historically multilayer devices designed for low frequency of operation have comprised uniform layer thickness through the height of the device. The potential for extended bandwidth through the use of non-uniform layers through the thickness dimension has been investigated. In addition commercially available stacked ceramic mechanical actuators have been investigated. A combination of theoretical and experimental assessment has been employed to evaluate each transducer technology. Selection of the passive phase for these multilayer devices is critical. Typically, these devices operate in the high power regime and as such selection of the passive polymer material is crucial - thermal stability coupled with thermal conductivity would be a virtue. To this end a number of polymer materials possessing the appropriate thermal properties have been investigated.