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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Strategies and networks for state-dependent quantum cloning

Chefles, Anthony and Barnett, Stephen M. (1999) Strategies and networks for state-dependent quantum cloning. Physical Review A, 60 (1). pp. 136-144. ISSN 1094-1622

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Abstract

State-dependent cloning machines that have so far been considered either deterministically copy a set of states approximately or probablistically copy them exactly. In considering the case of two equiprobable pure states, we derive the maximum global fidelity of N approximate clones given M initial exact copies, where N>M. We also consider strategies that interpolate between approximate and exact cloning. A tight inequality is obtained that expresses a trade-off between the global fidelity and success probability. This inequality is found to tend, in the limit N → ∞, to a known inequality that expresses the trade-off between error and inconclusive result probabilities for state-discrimination measurements. Quantum-computational networks are also constructed for the kinds of cloning machine we describe. For this purpose, we introduce two gates: the distinguishability transfer and state separation gates. Their key properties are described and we show how they may be decomposed into basic operations.