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Enhanced control strategy of full-bridge modular multilevel converter

Adam, G. P. and Finney, S. J. and Williams, B. W. (2015) Enhanced control strategy of full-bridge modular multilevel converter. In: 2015 International Conference on Renewable Energy Research and Applications (ICRERA), 2015-11-22 - 2015-11-25.

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Abstract

This paper describes a control approach that allows the cell capacitor voltages of the full-bridge modular multilevel converter (FB-MMC) to be controlled independent of the input dc link voltage. Moreover, this control approach offers the possibility of operating FB-MMC from bi-polar dc link voltages; thus, creating new possibilities for building generic hybrid dc grids with reversible dc link voltage, where the conventional line commutated current source converters can operate alongside voltage source converters. Furthermore, the presented control approach improves the dc fault ride-through of the FB-MMC compared to existing approaches. This could be achieved by an active control of the arm currents and cell capacitor voltages, and full exploitation of the FB-MMC redundant switch states. Operation of the FB-MMC with reversible DC link voltage and decoupled control of the cell capacitor voltages from the dc link voltage are demonstrated using simulations. The major findings and implications of this work are highlighted.