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EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Investigating receptor enzyme activity using time-scale analysis

You, Tao and Yue, Hong (2015) Investigating receptor enzyme activity using time-scale analysis. IET Systems Biology, 9 (6). pp. 268-276. ISSN 1751-8849

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Abstract

At early drug discovery, purified protein-based assays are often used to characterise compound potency. In the context of dose response, it is often perceived that a time-independent inhibitor is reversible and a time-dependent inhibitor is irreversible. The legitimacy of this argument is investigated using a simple kinetics model, where it is revealed by model-based analytical analysis and numerical studies that dose response of an irreversible inhibitor may appear time-independent under certain parametric conditions. Hence, the observation of time-independence cannot be used as sole evidence for identification of inhibitor reversibility. It has also been discussed how the synthesis and degradation of a target receptor affect drug inhibition in an in vitro cell-based assay setting. These processes may also influence dose response of an irreversible inhibitor in such a way that it appears time-independent under certain conditions. Furthermore, model-based steady-state analysis reveals the complexity nature of the drug-receptor process.