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The multivalent adhesion molecule SSO1327 plays a key role in Shigella sonnei pathogenesis : SSO1327 is an adhesin required for S. sonnei pathogenesis

Mahmoud, Rasha Y. and Stones, Daniel Henry and Li, Wenqin and Emara, Mohamed and Eldomany, R A and Wang, Depu and Wang, Yili and Krachler, Anne Marie and Yu, Jun (2015) The multivalent adhesion molecule SSO1327 plays a key role in Shigella sonnei pathogenesis : SSO1327 is an adhesin required for S. sonnei pathogenesis. Molecular Microbiology. ISSN 0950-382X

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Abstract

Shigella sonnei is a bacterial pathogen and causative agent of bacillary dysentery. It deploys a type III secretion system to inject effector proteins into host epithelial cells and macrophages, an essential step for tissue invasion and immune evasion. Although the arsenal of bacterial effectors and their cellular targets have been studied extensively, little is known about the prerequisites for deployment of type III secreted proteins during infection. Here, we describe a novel S. sonnei adhesin, SSO1327 which is a Multivalent Adhesion Molecule (MAM) required for invasion of epithelial cells and macrophages and for infection in vivo. The S. sonnei MAM mediates intimate attachment to host cells, which is required for efficient translocation of type III effectors into host cells. SSO1327 is non-redundant to IcsA; its activity is independent of type III secretion. In contrast to the up-regulation of IcsA-dependent and independent attachment and invasion by deoxycholate in S. flexneri, deoxycholate negatively regulates IcsA and MAM in S. sonnei resulting in reduction in attachment and invasion and virulence attenuation in vivo. A strain deficient for SSO1327 is avirulent in vivo but still elicits a host immune response.