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Hold on: physical restraint in residential child care

Steckley, L. and Kendrick, A. (2007) Hold on: physical restraint in residential child care. In: Residential Child Care: Prospects and Challenges. Research Highlights in Social Work . Jessica Kingsley Publishers, pp. 152-165. ISBN 978-1-84310-526-8

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Abstract

Guidance for developing best practice, policy and improved outcomes for children and young people in residential child care. Children in residential care can exhibit disturbed and violent behaviour which can result in them being aggressive to themselves and to others. Over many years practitioners, managers and policy-makers have tried to find ways of dealing with children whose behaviour is dangerous with a range of interventions such as crisis intervention and crisis de-escalation, as well as the use of sanctions such as restricting leisure activities and control of pocket money. There has also been some debate about the use of physical restraint by residential child care staff when the child or those around him or her need to be protected from the child's aggression without hurting or humiliating the child.