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Competition law compliance : The CMA 2015 study, compliance rationales and the need for increased compliance professionalism and education

Rodger, Barry (2015) Competition law compliance : The CMA 2015 study, compliance rationales and the need for increased compliance professionalism and education. European Competition Law Review, 36 (10). pp. 423-429. ISSN 0144-3054

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Abstract

Competition law, its implications for the economy and its consequences for industry are particularly topical and controversial. There are numerous examples of price - fixing cartels being uncovered by the competition authorities both internationally and dome stically, and there have also been recent and ongoing investigations and sanctions imposed under the EU abuse of dominance rule in Article 102 in relation to the unilateral conduct of global organisations such as Microsoft, Intel, and more recently Google and Amazon. The potential implications for UK industry of competition law and policy can be fairly dramatic, as stressed in the first brief part of this note. This sets the scene for the second part which will focus on the outcomes of a recent study of com pliance with competition law by UK businesses commissioned by the Competition and Markets Authority, and allows us to reflect on compliance research more generally and what can or should be done to further facilitate, cajole and encourage competition law compliance.